SEO daily routine

Sandra

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Picture this: a blog with drip feeding articles being published on their own one every day. So the writing part is out of the way.

What would be your daily routine to promote each article?

--Ping them, if the blog doesn't ping itself.
--Post links on Twitter, the facebook fan page, google+.
--Let your list know there is new content in the site.
--Post snippets on the site's pages at wp, blogspot and tumblr.
--Pin the images if they are good.
--Stay around in case there are conversations to answer.
--Look for other blogs that posted similar content and add comments with links back.

Something more? Something less? Any way to automate this?
 

NahidHasan

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- You can try some other networks like triberr.
- buffer can help you share your new posts on social media by two clicks.
 
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Sandra

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Sandra
So what is your daily routine? You use buffer and tribber?

I use hootsuite for scheduled posting, but how to do it when there is still no link?
 

NahidHasan

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NahidHasan
Actually I dont have any specific daily routine for SEO and I dont create backlinks for every post. Mostly I focus on building relationship and finding opportunities to get some high quality backlinks. Few high quality backlinks pass enough SEO juice to boost SERP. I use buffer for social shares. It helps in SEO and also helps me get lots of referral traffic.

The things I do daily which might help in SEO
==> Read several blogs
==> Participate on Forums
==> Comments on high quality blogs (not for SEO, for engagements)
==> Content Syndication, mainly to create several versions (like, text content to infograph, blog post to power point presentation etc)

All of these activities help me get lots of high quality backlinks each month.
 

PTTed

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I'm not a big fan of automating link building with a money site. I think it just isn't worth the risk and the links you get using automation won't be that good anyway unless you have some really sophisticated setup.

I have automated social in the past, and still do to some extent, but that is only because I don't like to spend time on the social sites myself (too much time suck). When I automated in the past I used a number of different social automation tools. On the one site I had the most success with, I was semi-automating social using Onlywire. But those were real accounts that just syndicated the same message out to a number of different social platforms. I know that I had some followers coming to my site from those social sites. And it made me feel like it was simulating human interest in the eyes of the search engines. Actually I think I was using Hootsuite combined with Onlywire. Hootsuite read my feed and Tweeted when a new article was published. Onlywire saw the Tweet and then sent the blurbs to the rest of the social sites (like about 15 of them I think). I really don't do any of that anymore. Don't need to.

After trying to use every SEO spam tool and every type of site to build links for SEO over the years, I eventually came to a conclusion. The best use of my time is taking the time to build and/or acquire one link that will actually count and pass PageRank and actually help boost the rankings of the page/site it links to. Therefore, I don't link build in quantity at all anymore. Again, don't need to. If you are getting links that count, you really don't need that many of them. This is especially true if you are doing all the other SEO things right (excellent on-page and site-wide SEO). The type of links I like the best are links that look 100% natural (like some webmaster created the link because it is useful for the person visiting that page). They are contextually embedded links from authoritative pages.

With that in mind, if I was building a site like you outlined here, if one of the articles I was publishing was an article that I thought was worth ranking highly, I would start out by going and getting one link (that counts) pointing at that page. If I felt it needed it (and most pages do need it), I would also build some internal links from other pages within the site that point to that new page using relevant anchor text (keywords I hope to rank for).

Based on the type of site you are talking about, it sounds like the site is going to have hundreds of pages where one new page is published every day. I would not build links to every single new page that is published. If I had access to somewhere where I could very easily and inexpensively acquire limitless amounts of great links that won't get penalized, then I probably would build a lot more links. But that source doesn't exist to my knowledge.

Because acquiring good links is time consuming and sometimes costly, I would try to get high rankings with the least amount of links possible. Therefore, I would build a couple really juicy links to the homepage probably. I would also just build a link or two each to the internal pages that I felt I wanted to rank the highest for their relevant keywords. Of course I would also do the internal links to sculpt the PageRank where I want it to go.

As far as that business model you outlined is concerned:

As my methods continue to evolve for building websites, I find myself moving to building sites that have fewer pages on them. But those pages have higher quality content. If I am going to take the time to produce a page by myself using my time to do it, then I am only going to try to produce something above average. Sometimes I succeed and sometimes not. But I don't go for volume anything anymore. I just don't think it is worth it. At least not based on my experience. So I no longer build money sites that have to drip content for some reason. I just publish the content pretty much all at once. If at some point I have new content to add, then I add it when that content is produced.
 

Sandra

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Hi Ted, thanks for the great feedback.
I'm not fun of automation myself. It just doesn't do what I want the way I want.
The drip feeding part was to take writing out of the schedule. I do have one site that drip feeds, but it uses great content from other people that they share with me. And to this I add my own content in a not so organized manner.

So let me see if I get it right. For each page your routine would be:
--one good external link.
--internal linking.
Anything else?
I use the places I mentioned to communicate with people who showed interest in the site that there is new material. It is not a link building technique per se. How do you let your followers know there is new material?
 

PTTed

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So let me see if I get it right. For each page your routine would be:
--one good external link.
--internal linking.
Anything else?
Remember that one good external link is not for every page. Let's say the website has 20 pages on it. I might get a few links to the homepage. Then out of those other 19 pages, I might have juicy inbound links pointing to 4 or 5 of them. Those 4 or 5 will be pages that I want to rank high for a certain keyword.

I do not try to get every page on a website to rank number one on Google. I typically try to get one or two pages ranking that high. The others will rank moderately well anyway for a lot of long tail keywords assuming the on-site and on-page SEO is well done and assuming the site has enough accumulated link juice (a.k.a. Google PageRank) from whatever inbound links I got.

In the past, on some sites, I tried to get just about every page to rank as high as possible for one specific phrase unique to that page. When I did that, I noticed that the quality of the content suffered. Therefore, I quit doing that. I am a believer in producing as good of content as reasonably possible because it pays you compound interest with your website over time. People will like the site more. People will share the site more naturally. And Google will be able to tell people like the site. Therefore it will rank higher (in theory) as a result.

I use the places I mentioned to communicate with people who showed interest in the site that there is new material. It is not a link building technique per se. How do you let your followers know there is new material?
Most of the sites I create have evergreen content on them and a finite amount of content. So, once a person consumes the content that is on the site, there really isn't always a reason for them to return to the site. So most of my sites don't even try to get people to return to them. If I want to stay in contact with that visitor for a reason, then I will give something away and build a list. Then I will send that list a notice when new content is published. In general though, I don't do a lot of that.

I don't build sites intended to get people to keep coming back to again and again and again because those types of sites require ongoing work. They require new content being published regularly. They require upkeep and updating more than the typical evergreen site. I don't need or want to create another job for myself. I want to create an asset that will make me money and grow in value over time with very little maintenance and upkeep on my end. Otherwise I simply wouldn't have the time to manage my sites. And I don't like hiring employees. And I don't like outsourcing if I can help it. I ran a local business with employees for more than a decade when I was in my late twenties through my thirties. I promised I wasn't going to do that to myself again anytime soon. No thanks.

If the site requires a lot of ongoing work, then I would need a business partner who is willing to do it. Because, I certainly am not into that.

Since I started doing more evergreen sites, I came to realize they were superior in pretty much every way. You make more money in a lot less time. Well, at least that has been my experience.
 

savidge4

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I think this is a great question...

I personally do not use automated drip posting.. SO aprt of my routine,would be to manually publish the post. In terms of Automating the rest... oh heck yeah. IF you are using wordpress a neat little trick, use Feedburner as your RSS feed. This does 3 things for you, it obviously makes the post available on your RSS feed ( duh ) It also pings Google that you have new content, and lastly.. if you happen to have a G+ account tied into the site, it will send up a link to your G+ account for your new content.

What gets real interesting with the above automation is that aside from the site being wordpress the remaining services are ALL Google properties. ( FeedBurner, G+, and Google Search ) As you start using this method you might happen to notice a thing or 2 about the visibility of your content within the Google Network!

Aside from that, I use IFTTT. with this you can send notice of your new content in all kinds of places ( as well as send a back up of the file to dropbox ) you can even turn on a lamp in your office if you so choose to ( no I am not kidding ) I have actually modified this service, and it turns on my coffee maker! LOL

Since all of the sharing of my content is Automated, I then can use the rest of my time creating authority on other sites related to my niche!

Picture this: a blog with drip feeding articles being published on their own one every day. So the writing part is out of the way.

What would be your daily routine to promote each article?

--Ping them, if the blog doesn't ping itself.
--Post links on Twitter, the facebook fan page, google+.
--Let your list know there is new content in the site.
--Post snippets on the site's pages at wp, blogspot and tumblr.
--Pin the images if they are good.
--Stay around in case there are conversations to answer.
--Look for other blogs that posted similar content and add comments with links back.

Something more? Something less? Any way to automate this?
 

PTTed

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May I ask how do you monetize them?
Depends on the site - Those methods include - Google Adsense, list building w/affiliate marketing, affiliate sales directly from the site itself, list building to sell my own product, direct product sales, selling services, selling advertising and subscription based monetization. Typically each site uses one specific monetization method. I choose the method I think fits the site the best. When I create a new site I typically have an idea in mind of how I am going to ultimately monetize it. Sometimes my idea works better than expected and sometimes it fails miserably.


And how do you manage to stay up in the rankings if after certain point they are stationary in content?
I rank pages by producing superior content and then by getting superior links to that content. If the links you get are permanent (or at least semi-permanent) links and the links stay intact, then the page keeps ranking at the top of Google. Of course the pages/websites your links come from also have to stay juicy meaning that they must maintain or even increase the amount of link juice they possess. But as long as the link juice remains constant or increases, then your rankings stay there.

All of this public talk about needing freshness or talk about adding new content as a major ranking factor is complete B.S. You don't need fresh content at all. You don't necessarily need to update a site at all. And once you have enough link juice to the site, you don't need any additional links built to that site ever again. And just so you know, you don't need any social signals whatsoever. You can rank inner pages and homepages without one single social media link at all. In my experience it makes absolutely no difference whatsoever.

If you have done your on-page and on-site SEO well, then the only reason you will lose your rankings is if 1) people dislike your page or 2) you lose some of your inbound link juice or 3) someone who knows what they are doing decides they want to outrank you for the keywords you want to rank for.

That is pretty much it. Otherwise you will maintain your rankings in perpetuity even when Google makes tweaks to their ranking algorithms. So it pays to get wicked juicy links from sites that will stick around for years and years and won't lose their link juice. And you don't need very many of them at all contrary to what most people think.
 

Sandra

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I think this is a great question...

I personally do not use automated drip posting.. SO aprt of my routine,would be to manually publish the post. In terms of Automating the rest... oh heck yeah. IF you are using wordpress a neat little trick, use Feedburner as your RSS feed. This does 3 things for you, it obviously makes the post available on your RSS feed ( duh ) It also pings Google that you have new content, and lastly.. if you happen to have a G+ account tied into the site, it will send up a link to your G+ account for your new content.

What gets real interesting with the above automation is that aside from the site being wordpress the remaining services are ALL Google properties. ( FeedBurner, G+, and Google Search ) As you start using this method you might happen to notice a thing or 2 about the visibility of your content within the Google Network!

Aside from that, I use IFTTT. with this you can send notice of your new content in all kinds of places ( as well as send a back up of the file to dropbox ) you can even turn on a lamp in your office if you so choose to ( no I am not kidding ) I have actually modified this service, and it turns on my coffee maker! LOL

Since all of the sharing of my content is Automated, I then can use the rest of my time creating authority on other sites related to my niche!
Yes! yes! I remember that from one of the seminars. The idea was that google detected its own content easier? How could I forget? Thanks!! Yet again...

:yourock:

Depends on the site - Those methods include - Google Adsense, list building w/affiliate marketing, affiliate sales directly from the site itself, list building to sell my own product, direct product sales, selling services, selling advertising and subscription based monetization. Typically each site uses one specific monetization method. I choose the method I think fits the site the best. When I create a new site I typically have an idea in mind of how I am going to ultimately monetize it. Sometimes my idea works better than expected and sometimes it fails miserably.


I rank pages by producing superior content and then by getting superior links to that content. If the links you get are permanent (or at least semi-permanent) links and the links stay intact, then the page keeps ranking at the top of Google. Of course the pages/websites your links come from also have to stay juicy meaning that they must maintain or even increase the amount of link juice they possess. But as long as the link juice remains constant or increases, then your rankings stay there.

All of this public talk about needing freshness or talk about adding new content as a major ranking factor is complete B.S. You don't need fresh content at all. You don't necessarily need to update a site at all. And once you have enough link juice to the site, you don't need any additional links built to that site ever again. And just so you know, you don't need any social signals whatsoever. You can rank inner pages and homepages without one single social media link at all. In my experience it makes absolutely no difference whatsoever.

If you have done your on-page and on-site SEO well, then the only reason you will lose your rankings is if 1) people dislike your page or 2) you lose some of your inbound link juice or 3) someone who knows what they are doing decides they want to outrank you for the keywords you want to rank for.

That is pretty much it. Otherwise you will maintain your rankings in perpetuity even when Google makes tweaks to their ranking algorithms. So it pays to get wicked juicy links from sites that will stick around for years and years and won't lose their link juice. And you don't need very many of them at all contrary to what most people think.
Ok, I think I get it... so... you don't need to work on the pages because the source of your link does it, and you choose your keywords in a way that are good to bring traffic but will not call the attention of the competition?

I kind of did the same for one of my sites, but not on purpose. Well, more or less. The thing is, I have been on first page for a couple of years now for my main keywords without extra promotion.

Thanks soooo much!! You are :smart:

:ertery:
 

PTTed

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Ok, I think I get it... so... you don't need to work on the pages because the source of your link does it
I'm not completely clear on what you mean there. Are you thinking that I don't need to update pages or add new content because the inbound links provide enough link juice to overcome any of that? That is not the case. I am suggesting that Google doesn't care one bit about whether the content is fresh or not for the vast majority of queries. There are certain queries that deserve freshness. Most do not. Therefore it is a complete non-factor in the ranking algorithm for most search queries. So I am suggesting that anyone who thinks updating a site helps them rank better because the content is fresher is wrong in most cases. The update is completely irrelevant. If you improve your on-page SEO then updating can help. If you improve the user experience and likability of the page, then that can indirectly help rankings, but otherwise updating content just because you think Google wants fresh content is futile. Once someone has been ranking sites/pages long enough, they come to realize this. You learn it with experience.

and you choose your keywords in a way that are good to bring traffic but will not call the attention of the competition?
I don't really think about competition much at all. Really I don't. Like most people, years ago, I used to base a lot of my decisions about what keywords to target based on keyword volume using tools like Google Keyword Planner. Most of the time now, I actually ignore keyword volume. I don't even check it much of the time. Instead I base my keyword decisions on what keywords I think are going to bring in traffic that will convert. A lot of my sites go after low volume long tail keywords that convert extremely well. I may check keyword volumes for two or three phrases just to see which of those phrases gets more volume, but I only do that after I have already narrowed my keywords down to those two or three phrases. And my primary decision is based on whether I think that keyword will convert or not.

Because I am usually targeting long tail keywords, the competition is irrelevant. You can usually outrank them very easily. Not always, but often times. This is especially true if you are targeting that long tail with your homepage and the other competing sites are ranking inner pages. Even if you target the keyword with an inner page, if your primary goal is to get just a few pages ranked well, it is generally a lot easier to do. You can focus all of your internal PageRank to those few pages while the other sites you are competing against have very little internal PageRank going to those pages that are competing against you. It gives you an advantage because every time you get one more link to any page on your site, a significant amount of PageRank from that inbound link ends up flowing to those few pages you are trying to get ranked well. On your competitor sites, the PageRank of their inbound links ends of flowing to other pages targeting other shorter keywords they think are more important than the little old long tail you are going after. For most of those long tails, the other guys aren't actively competing with you. They just happen to rank well for that long tail because of their website's built up authority and because they do great on-page SEO by default. Nobody is watching that keyword though.


I kind of did the same for one of my sites, but not on purpose. Well, more or less. The thing is, I have been on first page for a couple of years now for my main keywords without extra promotion.
Yep. As long as the links that are giving your site its juice stay there indefinitely, then your site will probably do well indefinitely (assuming you don't trip any Google quality check algorithms).
 
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