How will the online ads industry be different 5 years from now?

lkovnih226

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The trending of online ads is increasing strongly recent years, the online ads industry will be enabled across all channels, and be almost perfectly personalized, you can see examples like Google ads, social networks ads, ads on high traffic sites...etc but I want to know, in 5 years more, will people still want to see online ads and it will be different from now?
 

Ron Killian

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Sorry, but how can any one answer that? The net changes alot, it moves pretty fast.

5 years is a LONG time when it comes to the net.

I am guessing it will be different. But I doubt it will be that different. Look at radio, tv, newspapers, those channels still have ads, like they always have.

Guessing, one difference might be more paid content, like some places are already trying to move. Pay and ads are gone. We'll have to see if Youtube can pull it off first.
 

EpicGlobalWeb

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We can, I believe, make note of some useful facts and determine some likely outcomes. First, let's take a look at why digital advertising got so big so fast. To understand this, we'll have to take a look at some basic economic factors that cause it. Ready?

Search Engine Ads

Search engines have always used ads since the days of Lycos and Alta Vista. They quickly realized that relevant search offered better engagement. Being digital in form, it was also easy to track exact patterns or searches and clicks. The internet was still not quite trusted enough to be seen as credible. In fact, when I was in high school, I was told that internet-related research was not credible and could not be used in essay citations.

Fast forward 10 years to 2005. Google came out with Ajax-search suggestions. It had over a billion users. Advertising became profitable on Google because it solved a useful problem - finding the right business lead at the right time. Web developers began closing a $29 Billion market gap in SEO, of which $4 Billion is still yet-to-be-closed today. (When market gaps closed, they become "industry standard.)"

In the next 5 years at this rate, SEO and mobile responsiveness will be considered industry standard and will no-longer be a competitive edge to sell.

Let's look at some numbers I found from Statistica (these are rough for sake of ease):

The newspaper industry lost 45% of its market share between 2001 and 2008. When the financial housing bubble burst and big banks failed, the Fed responded by pumping $4 Trillion into the economy from thin air. The result was massive job loss and lots of inflation.

One way companies in cahoots with the government (like Google) mask inflation is to replace bubbles with their solutions. At the same time 45% of newspaper market share was lost, 30% of that was taken by Google. This means that ~15% of the money supply was no-longer in the economy, and was "freed up" in order to buy bank-funded treasury bonds.

What Does This Mean For The Future?

As far as internet marketing goes, we can count on mobile transactions to replace paper money and re-shape the internet. One reason for this is in order to keep the financial institutions limping along, they will eventually need another bubble. The next bubble is anybody's guess. But it's possible that all computing will be done by phone and tablet instead of desktops and laptops within 5 years.

Therefore, digital advertising will be even more content-based, and in-mobile ads will likely dominate the advertising sector, alongside search ads. One reason for the collapse of desktops and laptops is simply because they require more raw materials to produce. Plastics are often derived from oil, and circuits from gold and silver. Now that phones and tablets have similar computing power but with less material use, we will for this reason likely see a collapse of the desktop computer market, thus shifting all digital ads to become mobile-centric.

I could go on but I'm sick and sleepy.
 

Ron Killian

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For me personally I can not see doing all my computing from a phone. I don't really use my phone that often and it's too small to do any "work". Least for me. Same for my tablet. Plus there are SO many things that are easier and faster to do with a mouse. And I use FTP and Dreamweaver.

But this is just me. :) Maybe because I am getting old.

Then you have businesses, they will still need computers. Well, unless some incredible new gadgets come out, which they could.

Just "seems" it will be a long time before desktops are gone, if ever.

Opinions of course.
 

EpicGlobalWeb

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I don't either. I'm referring mostly to the consumer market, however. Servers and businesses might still use them but I can see where they will be obsolete at some point.

As someone who personally enjoys programming, I know I can't do that on a cell phone. Tried before - it sucked.
 

EpicGlobalWeb

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I should add also that IoT is getting a lot of buzz recently. Verizon sponsored a $1,000,000 prize content to whoever could come up with the best Internet of Things concepts. Perhaps also in 5 years, ad space will be broadly opened and be incorporated in things that would seem ridiculous today, such as license plates and stop signs?

Think about it, 4G internet speeds are well-enough to process database inquiries. They're not QUITE economically viable just yet. Have you heard of Raspberry PI or Arduino? They are basically $10 computers what run on 9v batteries (well, the Arduino does) and they can send text messages and emails to a server.

Those messages can just as easily be SQL code. And because of their size (~ 3 square inch) they can be placed almost anywhere.

We also saw GM's Chevy Traverse release wi-fi technology inside their cars for 2016 earlier this year. Internet-powered grids are the next infrastructure above standard telephone and power lines.

Cable TV will be obsolete, and replaced by Amazon Firesticks (they're hot sellers here in Detroit - can anyone else see how this will completely replace TV ads as we know it?). Telephones as we know it will be 100% VOIP just like Vonage, Magic Jack, and Comcast already currently offer.

Internet speeds will double and triple, then these devices will exchange information functionality for ad space. Car computers will be standardized. Soon, billboards will be 100% electronic, which will remove the need for repainting / re-posting (they already do this here in Detroit)

Ad space will no longer be confined to screens, but it will be the new infrastructure of our world. In 5 years? Maybe not. 10? Sure. Businesses like the idea of being able to collect marketing data and measure their ROI.

I can easily see a bunch of bubbles here, can you? :D
 

Rob Whisonant

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I could be totally wrong about this but here are my thoughts on the subject. This is going to be a little hard to explain so...

I can see content morphing into ads that the reader is not even aware of it being advertising. Let's say a surfer has been looking at new TVs recently. Now when he visits other sites the content he is consuming starts mentioning specific TVs. The content may have nothing directly to do with TVs. But parts of the content morphs and works in a TV brand into it.

I am sure you have seen product placements on TV shows. Cars, sodas etc... This is what I am talking about. Content with custom product placements within it based on what the surfer has previously looked at.
 

EpicGlobalWeb

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EpicGlobalWeb
This isn't weird to me at all, this is basically advertorials 2.0 and a very likely outcome. This is soft programming of the subconscious and very feasible in the future. The advent of smart tv's might make this easier to develop.
 

Ron Killian

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But wouldn't that all be bordering on subliminal? Or a very fine line at the very least. And That it suppose to be illegal, is it not?

It wouldn't surprise me, but that is a bit much if you ask me.

And if all this comes to past, it will be even more about branding.
 

Rob Whisonant

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Rob Whisonant
Product placement has been going on for years now on TV. From what I understand it's only illegal if the viewer can't see it and only sees it sub consciously. Like when they ad a single frame in a 30 second frame per second video with a subliminal message.
 

EpicGlobalWeb

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I had no idea subliminal was illegal. It was the cornerstone of my world domination plans
 

EpicGlobalWeb

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Yeah it's not the law that's the problem it's ethics. We have to be responsible dominators. :)
 

Rob Whisonant

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Hmmmm. I started researching subliminal laws and from what I have found it is NOT illegal. Seems it is banned by the FCC and the FTC does consider it deceptive advertising. But it's not illegal from what I see.
 
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